Later

One of my workflow tricks as a photographer (now that I kinda know what I’m doing) is to not dive right into my edits right away.  I wait a while and edit later.  I let some time pass between when I shoot and when I edit.  I can’t really articulate why this is, but I just know that if I’m too eager to jump into the edit it’s not as creative as when I wait plus it’s a bonus when I go back through my images and find ones I forgot I shot.  Of course, with thos pesky deadlines looming this isn’t always practical.

Later

Order a print of this image. | North River in Bridgewater, VA shot about a month ago.

Compression

Before anybody gets too upset, the camera was really nowhere near the cupola.  Photographers use compression all the time – it’s what makes objects in z-space look so much closer than they really are.  A longer lens will make the objects’ relative size so drastically different and they appear closer to each other.  I was using a 400mm lens (which, on my crop frame camera is essentially a 640mm lens).  I was probably 40-50 meters away from it.

I always err on the side of caution.  I quickly grabbed this shot and then got the heck out of there.

I always err on the side of caution. I quickly grabbed this shot and then got the heck out of there.

Angle of View

My depth perception is always a little off when I’m flying this thing.  Since it’s a pretty wide-angle lens, it’s really difficult to gauge where exactly I am in z-space.  But it makes for some really cool angles and images when I can figure it out.

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The iconic cupola at Handley High School

 

It’s Not OK!

We devote an enormous amount of time and effort to improve our craft.  To develop our own style.  To create art.  We put ourselves out there, sometimes in very vulnerable situations.

When I say “we” I mean Creatives – anybody who creates.  It could be paintings.  Perhaps videos.  How about crafts or wood carvings?  For me, it’s photography.

And those “vulnerable” situations I mentioned have everything to do with this phenomenon called the interwebs.  Internets.  The internet folks.

For most Creatives, their art is their main source of income.  It’s a business.  It’s a job and a career.  It was a choice.  IT’S NO OK, PEOPLE, TO EXPECT US TO ALWAYS GIVE IT AWAY FOR FREE!  You don’t expect to walk into your local grocery store/pharmacy/department store and walk out without paying do you?  Why is it any different with photography?  IT’S NOT.  I’ll continue to consider freebies and I’ll make decisions based on my own business model and expectations at the time, but don’t get upset if I come right back at you with a link to purchase a commercial  license to use my work.

The experts say that you need to have a web presence these days.  A social media presence.  Ok.  Done.  That opens up a can of worms doesn’t it?  So how do I keep people from taking my images and sharing them elsewhere?  There’s no way you can catch everything.  It’s a pretty vulnerable situation indeed.  Here’s my thinking:

  • I post an image to a social media platform (an actual image, not a link) – I expect people to share it if the desire hits them.  That’s the way it works.
  • I post an actual image to my blog (here at cedarmeadestudios.com) – I expect people to “like” it or share it.  That’s the way it works.  By the way, all the images on this site are posted with a Creative Commons License.   Creative Commons License
  • I post an image to my online galleries (cedarmeadestudios.smugmug.com) – I expect people to purchase those images if the desire hits.  It’s an online store people.  This screen grabbing has got to stop.  IT’S NOT OK!  Just because an image is on the internet does not mean it’s “up for grabs.”  IT’S NOT OK.  Did I mention that already.  Technically it’s stealing.

Like I said, I can’t catch everything.  It’s impossible.  I have, however, discovered multiple issues where an image of mine is being used (one from my online galleries) and I have no record of it being purchased.  That’s stealing people.  IT’S NOT OK!

But the latest issue (the impetus behind this post) has really got me heated.  Angry.  Downright pissed off!  And I’ll be addressing the issue with the guilty party.  I’m hoping that it’ll be a simple “Oh wow, I’m so sorry.” but I feel this goes beyond “simple.”  Who knows, maybe this person will approach me after I post this – we’ll see.

I discovered one of my online gallery images imbedded in a Twitter feed.  I have no record of it being purchased.  And credit was given to someone else for having created it!  WTF?!

IT’S NOT OK!

I've steered clear of watermarking, but perhaps I'm on to something with this watermark.

I’ve steered clear of watermarks, but perhaps I’m on to something with this one.  Maybe you’d like to order a print of this image – the actual image with no watermarks.

 

Contrasty

The real trick to creating a decent monochromatic image is to have a really contrasty image to start with.  I’m really digging what the new GoPro cameras can do.  The fact that I now have much more control over the exposure is what drew me to them.  I’m not even using it as an action camera as it was initially intended.  Now I have to figure out a way to attach this to my current aerial rig…

12/24

If you asked me a year ago with which lens I preferred to use to shoot races I would have answered, without hesitation, “my 70-200.”  These days, not so much.  Almost 50% of my images from the last two weekends of shooting cyclocross were shot on my 12-24 lens.  This also plays into my purposeful shooting method for sports.  Today’s image has nothing to do with cycling other than it was shot at one of the coolest race venues around.

Every year I discover that the Warfield Complex is more boarded up in certain places and more dilapidated in others.  It certainly makes for some fun images .

Every year I discover that the Warfield Complex is more boarded up in certain places and more dilapidated in others. It certainly makes for some fun images .

Purposeful

If there’s one thing that I’ve learned from all my sports shooting it’s that high-speed burst shooting should be used very sparingly.  I think it was last year that I came home from shooting Winchester Applecross with close to 7,000 images.  Three 0’s people!  Sure the high-speed bursts have their place, but for me I’d rather come home with images that were shot purposefully as opposed to images that are simply part of a series of high-speed bursts where maybe one is decent.  I don’t want to be that photographer who tries to impress people with the sound of their shutter rapidly firing off 20 frames at a time in a couple of seconds.  So how, then, do you get the good images you might ask?  Anticipate the action and know the sport you’re shooting.  I still came home with a crap ton of images (2k but that’s a far cry from 7,000).

Winchester Applecross coming my way.

Winchester Applecross coming my way.